Friday, August 5, 2016

THE END OF A 300-YEAR ERA AS THE LAST NEWSPAPER OFFICE IN FLEET STRET CLOSES DOWN

Fleet Street today
  The last newspaper office in Fleet Street, the London HQ of the Dundee-based Sunday Post, is closing up and leaving what was once seen as the centre of UK journalism as well as  frequent  drunkenness and bad behaviour.
   For 300 years Fleet Street was synonymous with the nation's biggest newspapers and also some of its biggest drinkers.
 The first British daily newspaper, the Daily Courant, was published in Fleet Street on 11 March 1702.
 News agency Reuters was among the last newsrooms on Fleet Street before it moved staff to new offices in Canary Wharf in 2005. Agence France Press departed a few years later in 2009.
old Fleet Street
 At its height, "the Street of Shame" - as it was dubbed by some - was the pinnacle of a journalist's career, with nearly every national paper and several provincial newspapers having offices within a half-mile radius.
 The street was famous for its many bars and pubs, constantly occupied by journalists both socialising and seeking stories and, at closing time, staggering either to the Press Club, which stayed open until 2am, or Covent Garden where the pubs opened before dawn for the flower market workers.
Sunday Post building
 While many of the pubs, like the newspapers, have closed, a few
remain as nostalgic throwbacks to a bygone era: El Vino's which for years insisted on patrons
wearing a jacket and tie and where no women were allowed; the Old Bell, designed by Christopher Wren and still an occasional venue for journalist reunions; the Cheshire Cheese, which has been in the same spot since 1538 and where Charles Dickens was a regular; The Punch and Ye Old Cock are still there although the clientele is now very different.




,


1 comment: