Monday, July 10, 2017

CARA THINKS SHE LOOKS LIKE A 14-YEAR-OLD BOY



  Beautiful bisexual Cara Delevingne is in a happy, upbeat mood.

Cara in Valerian
  The 24-year-old party going socialite/musician/actress, who has been been romantically linked with both men and women, tells me:  "I love love. I'm a hopeless romantic and I think love has the power to save the world and save all of us."
  
  We are talking in the Four Seasons Hotel in Beverly Hills shortly before the world premiere of Valerian and the City of A Thousand Planets, the 150 million pounds sci-fi epic from Luc Besson in which she stars as a special operative investigating a dark force which threatens Alpha, the City of a Thousand Planets. 

   Her hair is cropped in a buzz cut for the movie she has been filming, Life in a Year, in which she plays a cancer victim. 


with crew-cut Cara
  "I'm in the short hair club and I  think that I look like a 14 year old boy, which is not bad but definitely not something that you want to go for as a 24 year old woman," she laughs. "I wouldn’t have done it without having to do it for a film, so I am glad I got that opportunity." 
   
   She says she was "sober, clean and clear-headed" during the six
weeks she was filming Life in a Year.

   "It was so important to be as focused as possible because it was  definitely the most intense and difficult role I have ever played and it was very important to spend most of my time trying to learn about what it would be like to have cancer and putting myself in those situations," she says.

Cara and Dane DeHaan in Valerian
  " It was a very dark six weeks because to really understand what it’s like to have cancer, I thought about death every second of every day and every morning when I woke up.  So if I wasn't completely clear headed it could have got very dangerous and I could have gotten sucked into massive depression."

   Cara originally opened up about her sexuality back in 2014, when she revealed she first fell in love with a woman at the age of  20.


  "I think you should be allowed to be who you are and not have to explain anything," she tells me. "More and more, not just young girls but young boys too, grow up struggling with being labelled and for them to understand who they are we have to completely demolish labels to stop them being put into a box or being someone they are not. 

 "Connecting emotionally, I think is the most important thing."

  

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